Tag Archive | corruption

GlaxoSmithKline bribery case

 

gskA Chinese court has fined GlaxoSmithKline nearly $500 million for bribery. It would seem that wherever GSK is, there we will also find instances of corruption of the very worst kind.

According to The New York Times, “Chinese authorities accused Glaxo of bribing hospitals and doctors, channeling illicit kickbacks through travel agencies and pharmaceutical industry associations — a scheme that brought the company higher drug prices and illegal revenue of more than $150 million. In a rare move, authorities also prosecuted the foreign-born executive who ran Glaxo’s Chinese unit.

After a one-day trial held in secrecy, the court sentenced Glaxo’s British former country manager, Mark Reilly, and four other company managers to potential prison terms of up to four years. The sentences were suspended, allowing the defendants to avoid incarceration if they stay out of trouble, according to Xinhua. The verdict indicated that Mr. Reilly could be promptly deported. The report said they had pleaded guilty and would not appeal.”

 

For further details about the case, read the full New York Times article here.

 

What a pity that the corrupt company managers weren’t sent to prison. It would certainly be nothing less than they deserve. Such people truly are the scum of the earth. GlaxoSmithKline seems to have a penchant for employing the scum of the earth. Funny, that. Surely it could have nothing to do with company practices ;)

 

Child regresses after vaccination

 

Take a minute to follow this link to CNN iReport and see the striking difference in behaviour in this child after vaccination. Come up with a feasible explanation in your own mind as to what else could have gone on with this child to cause him to lose eye contact and to start flapping his arms.

 

 

 

 

Disgraceful drug company tactics

 

“Pharmaceutical companies wooed academic leaders, ghostwrote articles, suppressed damaging health data and lavished doctors with gifts to make prescribing powerful psychotropic drugs to children a blockbuster profit center, a trail of lawsuits over the past two decades shows,” according to The Denver Post.

Since 2008, pharmaceutical companies have agreed to pay more than $13 billion to resolve U.S. Department of Justice allegations of fraudulent marketing practices. Among the cases:

• Eli Lilly distributed videotapes to doctors titled “The Myth of Diabetes” when marketing its antipsychotic Zyprexa, despite being aware of studies showing those taking the drug had a higher rate of diabetes, government investigators say. The government accused the company of pressing doctors to prescribe Zyprexa to children and collected a $1.4 billion fine.

• Pfizer, which paid a $2.3 billion fine to settle a whistle-blower lawsuit, hired 250 child psychiatrists to help market its antipsychotic Geodon despite there being no approved pediatric use for the drug from the FDA. As part of the settlement, Pfizer denied any wrongdoing.

• AstraZeneca paid a fine of $520 million to resolve allegations that it promoted the antipsychotic Seroquel to treat aggression, sleeplessness, anxiety and depression when the FDA had approved the drug only to treat schizophrenia and, later, bipolar mania. Government investigators said the company targeted child physicians.

• Johnson & Johnson targeted what it called key opinion leaders to help promote the use of anti-psychotic Risperdal in children, the government alleged in another lawsuit that resulted in a $2.2 billion fine to resolve criminal and civil allegations.

Read the full Denver Post article here. It is an excellent piece and mentions GlaxoSmithKline whistleblower, Greg Thorpe.

 

Pharmaceutical companies truly are the lowest of the low

 

Meanwhile, on the 2nd of September, GlaxoSmithKline released 45 litres of concentrated live polio virus solution into the water in Belgium. Oh, a round of applause for you, GSK. Well done! Such care and attention shown! Original press release here.

What else could we expect from GSK? It seems that they don’t have the regard for human life that they should.

Back in 2012, the Buenos Aires Herald reported that GlaxoSmithKline Argentina Laboratories Company was fined 400,000 pesos after 14 babies died in illegal vaccine trials. To put that fine in perspective, at this present time, one Australian dollar will buy 7.51 Argentine pesos. In other words, a 400,000 peso fine for 14 lives is nothing! A slap on the wrist, and then it’s business as usual for these apparent low lives. As far as I’m concerned, they are the scum of the earth. There’s little to convince me otherwise.

 

So let me get this straight. They killed babies in a trial in an attempt to create a product that will go on to injure more people. Brilliant.

drug reps

GlaxoSmithKline to be investigated by the Serious Fraud Office

The BBC news reported yesterday that “Drugs giant GlaxoSmithKline is to have its “commercial practices” investigated by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO).

The British company, which is already facing allegations of bribery in several countries, said it would “co-operate fully” with the SFO.”

As described on its own page, “The Serious Fraud Office is an independent government department, operating under the superintendence of the Attorney General.  Its purpose is to protect society by investigating and, if appropriate, prosecuting those who commit serious or complex fraud, bribery and corruption and pursuing them and others for the proceeds of their crime”.

 

Is GlaxoSmithKline stuck in a pattern of dishonest behaviour?

 

Back in 2012, GlaxoSmithKline “agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges of illegally marketing drugs and withholding safety data from U.S. regulators, and to pay $3 billion to the government in what the Justice Department called the largest health-care fraud settlement in U.S. history.”

 

GSK withheld safety data on Type 2 diabetes drug, Avandia.

As reported on drugwatch, “To date, tens of thousands of patients and their families have filed lawsuits against GlaxoSmithKline because of Avandia’s life-threatening complications. One estimate links the medication to as many as 100,000 heart attacks, strokes and heart failures, including many deaths.”

 

In what can only be described as utterly disgraceful behaviour, “G.S.K. executives attempted to intimidate independent physicians, focused on strategies to minimize or misrepresent findings that Avandia may increase cardiovascular risk, and sought ways to downplay findings that a competing drug might reduce cardiovascular risk,” The New York Times revealed in 2010.

 

During the aforementioned episode of health-care fraud, GlaxoSmithKline also copped it for promoting antidepressants for uses that were not approved by the FDA. Ah, GSK clearly respects our health so, so much. It just warms the cockles of the heart, doesn’t it.

 

Is honesty a dirty word at GSK?  It would appear so. In my opinion, people should ask questions and think twice when offered any prescription (was your doctor offered a ski trip  or concert tickets as a perk for pushing a drug on you?), and be aware that we represent nothing more than $$$$$$$$$$ to pharmaceutical companies.  We are not even viewed as human beings by them, as far as I can tell. One could very easily receive the impression that pharmaceutical companies view us as little more than cannon fodder in their war against true health. Oh, perhaps, I judge them too harshly. Of course they care very much about some humans. These special humans, deemed worthy of pharmaceutical company consideration, are known as shareholders. It’s of paramount importance that those special people have a very healthy bank balance. And if that healthy bank balance comes at the cost of someone’s healthy heart? Just keep those $$$$$$$$$$$$$ rolling in, boys! Next!

 

GlaxoSmithKline up to their old tricks

 

In light of reports of corrupt practices, involving a massive bribery network  in China, and a criminal investigation into allegations of bribery in Poland, clearly the current investigation by the Serious Fraud Office could not come soon enough.

One would wonder how GlaxoSmithKline executives manage to sleep at night.
Maybe there’s a pill for that.

 

money pills - Copy (3)